Speakers

Updated November 17, 2015
Choose by conference:
November, 6, 10:30 – 11:00, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Angel Alastuey (Physique, ENS-Lyon) Sum rules for ionic fluids and critical behaviours
plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 5, 09:45 – 10:00, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Angel Alastuey (Physique, ENS-Lyon) Introduction
plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 6, 11:30 – 12:00, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Jean-Noël Aqua (INSP) When charge and density fluctuations critically couple
plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 6, 12:00 – 12:30, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Édouard Brézin (LPTENS) Can the renormalization group lead to exact results?
plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 5, 16:30 – 17:00, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Françoise Cornu (LPT-Orsay) Current fluctuation relations : from fixed-time to first-passage time measurements. A solvable model as an example
plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 6, 10:00 – 10:30, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Jean Dalibard (Collège de France) Two-dimensional physics and Kosterlitz-Thouless transition: The superfluid order in cold atom gases
plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 5, 14:30 – 15:00, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Bernard Derrida (LPS) The Fisher KPP equation: an exactly soluble version
plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 6, 14:30 – 15:00, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Jean-Pierre Hansen (Chem. Dept.) Can Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics provide a Clue to the Transition From a Supercooled Liquid to an “Ideal Glass”?
plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 6, 16:30 – 17:00, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Hendrik Jan Hilhorst (LPT-Orsay) Extreme events in Poisson-Voronoi tessellations
abstract

Given a set of point-like “seeds” in $d$-dimensional Euclidean space, the associated Voronoi tessellation is the partitioning of space into cells such that each point of space is in the cell of the seed to which it is closest. In the case of independent and uniformly distributed seeds one speaks of a Poisson-Voronoi tessellation. We will discuss the statistical properties of rare or “extreme” cells: those (in $d=2$) that have a large number $n$ of sides; or (in $d=3$) that have a large number $n_F$ of faces, or that have a face with a large number $n_E$ of edges. Calculating the probability of such events reveals the entropic forces that are at play. Whereas microscopically we are facing a stochastic many-body problem, we will show that macroscopically there arise deterministic laws when $n$, $n_F$, or $n_E\to\infty$.

plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 5, 17:45 – 18:15, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Jean-Marc Jancovici (MINES ParisTech) Sticking to the law of conservation and the rule of three
plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 5, 10:00 – 10:30, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Joel Lebowitz (Rutgers University) Coulomb Systems: Thermodynamics, Fluctuations, Large Deviations and Rigidity
abstract

The properties of ordinary macroscopic matter are almost entirely determined by Coulomb interactions. Here I will give a brief survey of some exact results for such systems.

plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 5, 12:00 – 12:30, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Elliott Lieb (PU) Indirect Coulomb Energy with Gradient Correction
abstract

We prove a Lieb-Oxford-type inequality on the indirect part of the Coulomb energy (also known as the exchange-correlation energy) of a general many-particle quantum state, with a lower constant than the original one, but involving an additional gradient correction. The result is similar to an inequality of Benguria, Bley and Loss, except that our correction term is purely local, which is more usual for density functional theory. No previous knowledge of the subject will be assumed; a very short tutorial on the subject and its importance to quantum chemistry will be presented. (Joint work with Mathieu Lewin)

plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 5, 11:30 – 12:00, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Philippe André Martin (EPFL) Casimir effect at finite temperature : inert versus living conductors
plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 6, 17:00 – 17:30, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Oliver Penrose (Heriot-Watt Univ.) Negative absolute temperatures: facts and myths
plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 6, 15:00 – 15:30, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Jaroslaw Piasecki (Fac. of Physics) Critical correlations and hierarchy equations
abstract

In the classical theory of fluids the derivatives with respect to particle density of correlation functions of order $k$ are related to spatial integrals of correlation functions of order $(k+1)$. We study the corresponding infinite hierarchy of equations and the resulting generalized compressibility equations. We show that the critical behaviour requires taking into account correlation functions of arbitrary order. Critical exponents corresponding to integrated $k$-particle spatial correlations are shown to grow linearly with order $k$. We prove that the application of the superposition approximation expressing higher order correlations in terms of lower order ones precludes the existence of a critical point. We also comment on some predictions emerging from the YGB hierarchy.

plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 5, 10:30 – 11:00, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Ladislav Šamaj (Slovak Acad. of Sciences) Counterions Near a Charged Wall: Exact Results for Two-Dimensional Geometries
abstract

Large colloids, when immersed in a polar solvent like water, become charged by a fixed surface charge density, compensated by mobile “counterions”. Such sparse classical systems of particles exhibit poor screening properties, so the validity of standard Coulomb sum rules is questionable. The counterions mediate an effective interaction between like-charged colloids, which may be attractive at low enough temperatures. I shall concentrate on two-dimensional models with the logarithmic interaction potential, going from the finite disc to the semi-infinite planar geometry of the confining domain. For any coupling constant being a positive even integer, using an anticommuting representation of the partition function and many-body particle densities, a sequence of sum rules is derived. The amplitude function, which characterizes the asymptotic inverse-power law behavior of the two-body density along the wall, is found to be related to the particle density profile. The dielectric susceptibility tensor has the anticipated disc value in the thermodynamic limit, in spite of zero contribution from the bulk region.

plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 5, 15:00 – 15:30, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Tomohiro Sasamoto (Inst. of Technology) The 1D KPZ equation: exact solutions and universality
abstract

We discuss recent developments on the one dimensional KPZ equation and its universality. We first show the exact solutions for the height distribution and stationary two point correlation functions. Then we explain various generalizations and applications. We introduce a few new models in the KPZ class with some possible applications, and also discuss wide applicability of the KPZ universality in various contexts.

plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 5, 15:30 – 16:00, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Grégory Schehr (LPTMS) Top eigenvalue of a random matrix: large deviations and third order phase transition
plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
November, 6, 15:30 – 16:00, Amphitheater Hermite, Plenary Session
Émmanuel Trizac (LPTMS) A kinetic theory approach to adiabaticity shortcuts
abstract

Inspired from H-theorem requirements, a novel class of exact solutions to the quantum or classical Boltzmann equation is uncovered. These solutions, valid for arbitrary collision laws, hold for time-dependent confinement. We exploit them, in a reverse-engineering perspective, to work out a protocol that shortcuts any adiabatic transformation between two equilibrium states in an arbitrarily short time span, for an interacting system. Particle simulations corroborate the analytical predictions.

Collaboration with David Guéry-Odelin (LCAR, Toulouse).

plenary-session-1 Plenary Session
Web development: Thierry Masson (CPT, Marseille)